close
close

Cody Rhodes mentions his biggest red flag in professional wrestling

Cody Rhodes has been through a lot during his professional wrestling career.

He’s been a golden son of a Hall of Famer who signed up for the world’s biggest promotion of all time, a mid-carder with a bad gimmick who asked for his release into a very different landscape, an indie superstar who’s had the most viable challenger to WWE for over 20 years, eventually returning to where it all started so he could become the WWE Champion.

So when asked about the warning signs he’s experienced in the various locker rooms he’s been through over the years in an interview with Jonathan Coachman on Behind the turnbuckleRhodes made it known that he is not a fan of “legendary” wrestlers trying to help the young guys because they often use that mentality to push a hidden agenda.

“I hear the number one red flag. When you come across a guy who is a legend and makes the roster and starts being active, or a part-time guy, that’s the first red flag if you’re young or in the middle of the pack (as a ) Talent is when you see someone hears say, “I’m just here for the young boys.” I already know. You’re not just here for the young guys,” Cody Rhodes explained via Fightful.

“I’d rather you tell me honestly, ‘I’m here for some of you, and I’m here for myself.’ This is a selfish, competitive business. I like the most transparent people. “This is what I’d like to do, let’s do it.” Every time I hear, “I’m here for the young guys,” which doesn’t happen often or quickly, I’ve heard it. In my mind I immediately think, ‘That’s the biggest red flag ever. I’d rather he tell them he’s only here for himself.”

Is this a shot at anyone in particular, whether it’s his original AEW rival Chris Jericho, who is currently using a “Learning Tree” gimmick, “Edge” Adam Copeland, who has said the same about his run in Tony Khan’s company , or even CM Punk who famously used the phrase in an interview around the beginning of Collision? It’s impossible to know, but based on the online reactions, it’s safe to say fans and wrestlers are having a ball with the comments.

Cody Rhodes recalls his moment with John Cena WrestlingMania.

Elsewhere on his performance Behind the turnbuckle With Jonathan Coachman, Cody Rhodes reflected on his big moment at WrestlingMania 40 and how he was able to secure the WWE Championship with a little help from Seth Rollins, The Undertaker and John Cena.

While Rhodes clearly has a deep love for the show as it will likely be the defining moment of his professional wrestling career, it meant so much more because he was able to do it for ‘The Face That Runs The Place’. ‘ on whom the ‘American Nightmare’ based his career.

“It’s probably very easy for me to say WrestleMania 40 itself. Both nights. There is one particular moment at WrestleMania 40 that will stick with me forever. It’s not necessarily one, two, three because I was very big under the learning tree and a student of John Cena. I liked his model of a businessman as a babyface character in wrestling. More than that, I loved the model and standard he set as a human being. As a good ambassador for wrestling. As an authentic ambassador,” Cody Rhodes explains via Fightful.

“Our fans can smell it if this isn’t authentic. He was the right person for the job. We’re in the ring and Undertaker and Rock are having their moment. John stands off-camera against the back wall, watching Roman and I end as we both get closer. I just have to make eye contact with John. I don’t think I’ve ever learned anything more in my life than just the moment of eye contact with the captain, the leader, the guy. He’s here to be a part of this for me. It’s super moving. To have that moment with him, just a brief connection, knowing that I’m about to turn around and what’s going to happen, that’s the highlight of highlights.

From his Make-A-Wish appearances to his merchandising and especially his interactions with the WWE Universe, it’s clear that Rhodes is a certified disciple of Cena, right down to his refusal to turn heel. While only time will tell if Rhodes will find the same long-term success or if he’ll pull a Hollywood Hogan and turn to the dark side once again, it’s clear that he’s determined to continue down that path for the foreseeable future.